Indonesia’s Smuggled Bottle Birds

Image+from+https%3A%2F%2Fwww.petguide.com%2Fbreeds%2Fbird%2Fblack-capped-lory%2F

Image from https://www.petguide.com/breeds/bird/black-capped-lory/

The parrots were freed from the bottles when found in Fakfak in Indonesia's West Papua region
Image from https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-55016513

Last Thursday in Indonesia’s eastern region of Papua, police discovered over 70 smuggled exotic birds in a docked ship in the small port town of Fakfak.

According to the BBC article, “Parrots found stuffed in plastic bottles in Indonesia,” published on the 20th of November, 2020, the authorities were called when the crew noticed noises coming from a large crate. When police arrived they discovered around 64 of the birds still alive and around ten dead. The birds were stuffed in empty water bottles. The birds were later identified as black-capped lories, a protected species in the area. The police still do not know who was selling these or where they were headed for.

This is not the first time Indonesian police have seen something like this, in fact, Indonesia has a large ring of avian smuggling. In 2015 a man was caught trying to smuggle 21 yellow-crested cockatoos and in 2017 authorities in Indonesia found around 125 exotic birds forced inside of drain pipes during multiple wildlife raids. This is partially due to the fact that Indonesia has the highest number of threatened bird species in Asia. Another reason these birds are smuggled is their prices, according to the Bangkok Post article, “Smuggled parrots found stuffed in plastic bottles in Indonesia”, published on the 20th of November, 2020, some of these birds can sell for as much as $30,000.

Animal trafficking goes on all over the world and it up to you to report it to your local police if you suspect foul play.